Poetry Discussion and Workshop – Ross Gillett

Monday 6th July

5:30pm – 8:30pm 

Come along and enjoy a discussion of some of the big issues facing us as writers and/or readers of poems, followed by a workshop led by poet and experienced poetry group convenor, Ross Gillett.

What role does the fictionalising imagination play in the development of a poem? What might be some of the essential characteristics of a real poem? How do we move forward with a poem that seems to have stalled? These along with other questions and statements by some of the best poets about the art of poetry will be explored in the first part of the evening.

The second part of the session will be an opportunity to workshop one or two of your poems-in-the-making, and to contribute to the feedback on the work of other participants. Ross is strongly committed to a supportive and positive approach to workshopping, believing that every draft has strengths that can be built on even if it has weaknesses that need to be addressed.

Outcomes

  • New thoughts about the nature and function of poetry.
  • An understanding of some ideas about the relationship between the imagination and the experience from which a poem draws it material.
  • Some strategies for dealing with a draft that seems to have reached a dead end.
  • Solutions to problems you may be facing in the work you submit for workshopping.
  • An appreciation of the approaches taken and the issues faced by other participants in the session.

 

Date: 6th July

Time: 5:30pm – 8:30pm

Location: Newcastle – exact venue to be advised

What to bring: light dinner, writing material

Parking: to be advised

Public Transport: to be advised

Ross Gillett, winner of the 2018 Newcastle Poetry Prize

Ross Gillett has been a published poet for nearly thirty years, and has won a number of major Australian poetry awards, including the 2018 Newcastle Poetry Prize  (for his poem “Buying Online”) and the Fellowship of Australian Writers John Shaw Neilson Award (twice). He was shortlisted for the Peter Porter Poetry Prize in both 2019 and 2020. His first new book in more than ten years, The Mirror Hurlers, has recently been published by Puncher and Wattmann.

In his younger days Ross tutored and lectured in English Literature at Melbourne and Monash Universities, and he was the inaugural Poetry lecturer in the Creative Writing School at the then Prahran College of Education. In 2017 he retired after a thirty year career in the Victorian Public Service. He currently works as an appraiser, editor and proof reader of poetry manuscripts, and runs a weekly poetry discussion group and workshop in Daylesford, Victoria, where he lives.